Online Torque Calculator Convertor.

Try our free Online Torque Calculator Convertor below.

Online Torque Calculator Convertor.

Using this simple torque converter will help people in several ways:

  1. Simplify unit conversions: By providing a user-friendly interface, the torque converter allows users to easily input torque values in one unit and automatically obtain equivalent values in other units. This eliminates the need for manual calculations and reduces the chances of making mistakes during conversions.
  2. Better decision-making: Accurate torque values are crucial for making informed decisions in various industries, such as automotive, aerospace, and construction. By using the torque converter, professionals can ensure they are working with consistent and accurate measurements, leading to better decision-making and improved outcomes.
  3. Enhance communication and collaboration: The torque converter can facilitate communication and collaboration between individuals and teams that use different torque units. By converting values into a common unit, the converter helps to eliminate confusion and misunderstandings that can arise due to differing measurement systems.
  4. Time-saving: Manually converting torque values between different units can be time-consuming. The torque converter streamlines this process, enabling users to quickly obtain the information they need and focus on other aspects of their work.
  5. Educational tool: The torque converter can be used as an educational tool for students and professionals to better understand the relationships between different torque units and practice conversions. This can help to build a strong foundation in the understanding of torque and its various applications.

Torque Converter

Enter a value in any field and click 'Convert' to calculate the equivalent values in other units:



















 

What exactly in Torque?

Torque is a measure of the rotational force applied to an object, which causes the object to rotate or change its rotational motion around a pivot point or axis. In simple terms, torque can be thought of as the twisting force that causes rotation.

Torque is a vector quantity, which means it has both a magnitude (the amount of force) and a direction (the direction in which the force is applied). The magnitude of torque depends on three factors:

  1. The force applied: The greater the force, the greater the torque.
  2. The distance from the pivot point: Torque increases with the distance from the pivot point (or axis of rotation) at which the force is applied. This distance is called the moment arm or lever arm.
  3. The angle between the force and the moment arm: Torque is maximized when the force is applied perpendicular to the moment arm (90 degrees). As the angle between the force and the moment arm decreases, the torque decreases.

The SI (International System of Units) unit for torque is the Newton meter (Nm). Other units include pound-feet (lb-ft), pound-inches (lb-in), and kilogram-force meters (kgf-m), among others.

Torque is a fundamental concept in physics, engineering, and mechanics, playing a vital role in various applications, such as the operation of engines, tightening of fasteners, and performance of rotating machinery. Understanding torque is essential for designing and analyzing systems involving rotational motion.

There are several different units of measurement for torque, which is the rotational force applied to an object. Here are some of the most common units:

  1. Newton meters (Nm): This is the SI (International System of Units) unit for torque. It represents the torque produced by a one-newton force acting at a perpendicular distance of one meter from the pivot point.
  2. Pound-feet (lb-ft) or Foot-pounds (ft-lb): This is the most common unit of torque in the United States and is used predominantly in the automotive industry. One pound-foot of torque is the torque resulting from a one-pound force applied at a right angle to a one-foot-long lever.
  3. Pound-inches (lb-in): This unit is sometimes used for smaller amounts of torque, particularly in engineering applications. It is similar to pound-feet but uses inches instead of feet. One pound-inch is the torque resulting from a one-pound force applied at a right angle to a one-inch-long lever.
  4. Kilogram-force meters (kgf-m) or Meter-kilogram-force (m-kgf): This unit is derived from the force of Earth's gravity acting on a mass of one kilogram at sea level. One kilogram-force meter is the torque produced by a one-kilogram-force (9.81 N) applied at a right angle to a one-meter-long lever.
  5. Kilogram-force centimeters (kgf-cm) or Centimeter-kilogram-force (cm-kgf): This is a smaller unit of torque, similar to kgf-m, but uses centimeters instead of meters. One kilogram-force centimeter is the torque produced by a one-kilogram-force applied at a right angle to a one-centimeter-long lever.
  6. Dyne-centimeters (dyn-cm): This is a smaller unit of torque derived from the CGS (centimeter-gram-second) system of units. One dyne-centimeter is the torque produced by a one-dyne force applied at a right angle to a one-centimeter-long lever.
  7. aN-md (attoNewton-meter): This is a very small unit of torque, where 1 aN-md is equal to 10^-18 Nm. Atto is a prefix that denotes a factor of 10^-18, so this unit can be useful when dealing with extremely small torque values in micro or nano applications.
  8. cN-m (centiNewton-meter): This unit of torque is equal to 0.01 Nm or 1x10^-2 Nm. Centi is a prefix that denotes a factor of 10^-2. This unit can be useful when dealing with smaller torque values.
  9. mN-m (milliNewton-meter): This unit of torque is equal to 0.001 Nm or 1x10^-3 Nm. Milli is a prefix that denotes a factor of 10^-3. This unit is useful for smaller torque values, particularly in micro-mechanical systems or precision devices.
  10. ozf-in (ounce-force inch): This is a unit of torque based on the force of one ounce (avoirdupois) applied at a right angle to a lever of one inch in length. To convert ozf-in to Nm, you can use the following conversion factor: 1 ozf-in ≈ 0.00706155 Nm.
  11. N-m (Newton-meter): As previously mentioned, this is the SI unit for torque, representing the torque produced by a one-newton force acting at a perpendicular distance of one meter from the pivot point.
  12. in-lbs (inch-pounds): This is an alternative representation for pound-inches (lb-in), where one inch-pound is the torque resulting from a one-pound force applied at a right angle to a one-inch-long lever. To convert in-lbs to Nm, use the following conversion factor: 1 in-lb ≈ 0.113 Nm.
  13. ft-lbs (foot-pounds): This is an alternative representation for pound-feet (lb-ft), where one foot-pound is the torque resulting from a one-pound force applied at a right angle to a one-foot-long lever. As mentioned earlier, to convert ft-lbs to Nm, use the following conversion factor: 1 ft-lb ≈ 1.35582 Nm.

 Try our Force Convertor online calculator Here. 

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